Sage

Sage is native to countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and has been consumed in these regions for thousands of years. In medicinal lore, sage has one of the longest histories of use of any medicinal herb. Sage leaves are grayish green in color with a silvery bloom covering. They are lance-shaped and feature prominent veins running throughout

Nutritional Profile

Sage contains a variety of volatile oils, flavonoids (including apigenin, diosmetin, and luteolin), and phenolic acids, including the phenolic acid named after rosemary—rosmarinic acid. It is also an excellent source of vitamin K and a good source of vitamin A (in the form of provitamin A carotenoid phytonutrients).

Health Benefits

Like rosemary, its sister herb in the mint (Labitae) family, sage contains a variety of volatile oils, flavonoids (including apigenin, diosmetin, and luteolin), and phenolic acids, including the phenolic acid named after rosemary—rosmarinic acid.

How to Select and Store

Whenever possible, choose fresh sage over the dried form of the herb since it is superior in flavor. The leaves of fresh sage should look fresh and be a vibrant green-gray in color. They should be free from darks spots or yellowing.

Just like with other dried spices, when purchasing dried sage, try to select organically grown sage since this will give you more assurance that it has not been irradiated (among other potential adverse effects, irradiating sage may lead to a significant decrease in its vitamin C and carotenoid content.)

To store fresh sage leaves, carefully wrap them in a damp paper towel and place inside a loosely closed plastic bag. Store in the refrigerator where it should keep fresh for several days. Dried sage should be kept in a tightly sealed glass container in a cool, dark and dry place where it will keep fresh for about six months.

History

Sage has been held in high regard throughout history both for it culinary and medicinal properties. Its reputation as a panacea is even represented in its scientific name, Salvia officinalis, derived from the Latin word, salvere, which means “to be saved.”

Sage’s legendary status continued throughout history. Arab physicians in the 10th century believed that it promoted immortality, while 14th century Europeans used it to protect themselves from witchcraft.

Nutrition Chart

Sage, dried | 2 tsp | 1.40 g | Calories: 4

NUTRIENTAMOUNTDRI/DV (%)
Vitamin K24.00 mcg27
Vitamin C0.45 mg1
Vitamin A4.13 mcg 0
Vitamin E0.10 mg1
Vitamin B10.01 mg 1
Vitamin B30.08 mg 1
Vitamin B60.04 mg2
Manganese0.04 mg2
Folate3.84 mcg1
Iron0.39mg2
Copper0.01 mg1
Magnesium5.99 mg 1
Omega-3 fats0.02 g1
Omega-6 fats0.01 g0
Calcium23.13 mg2
Phosphorus1.27 mg0
Potassium14.98mg 0
Selenium0.05 mcg0
Sodium0.15 mg0
Zinc0.07 mg 1
Protein0.15 g 0
Fiber0.56 g2
Carbohydrates0.85 g0
Total Sugars0.02 g0

Tips for Preparing and Cooking

Tips for Preparing Sage

Since the flavor of sage is very delicate, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process so that it will retain its maximum essence. Mix cooked navy beans with olive oil, Use as a seasoning for tomato sauce, for omelets and frittatas, with plain yogurt for an easy to prepare, refreshing salad, or with chicken and fish.

The Healthiest Way of Cooking With Sage read: Recipes.

Source: http://www.whfoods.com

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